The Single System & OBHC

Single System LogoThe Single System is the development pathway for players, coaches and officials of all ages and abilities to reach their full potential.  It is based on Long Term Athlete Development (LTAD) principles that put the participant at the centre of all decisions, with extensive scientific research that has been widely accepted by the majority of the other major sports within England.  Click here to find out more about LTAD.

What is the Single System made up of?  The Single System encompasses the whole of the hockey landscape which includes club and school activity as well as the Single System development centres. When people talk about the Single System it is often mistaken as just the development centres, e.g. DCs, ACs, RPCs etc, but it is important to look at the hockey a player gets in all environments.

Why does hockey have a Single System?  The purpose of the Single System is to make opportunities for participants fair, equitable and consistent.  It is to ensure that a suitable level of coaching and competition is offered for people at the appropriate stage of their development and to maximise the chance they have of fulfilling their potential whether that potential is as a club or International player, coach or official.

How can I access the Single System?  The Single System can be accessed by playing at school, a local club or attending one of the local Single System centres. There is one entry point into the Single System centres which is at Development Centre level. The first time a player accesses the player pathway they must enter at DC level.  To view the Single System Flow Diagram click here.

JDC LogoWhat is a Development Centre (DC) and a Academy Centre (AC)?

DCs and ACs are local training centres for the U13 to U17 age groups.  DCs are open to any hockey player who has been nominated by their club, school or coach, with ACs open to any player who has been nominated by a DC coach.

After playing for a club or school, attending a DC is the next step on hockey’s player pathway.  The coach or teacher can nominate a player to attend an assessment for a DC if and when they think it is appropriate for the player’s development.JAC

After attending a DC, a AC is the next step on hockey’s player pathway.  A DC coach can nominate a player to attend an assessment for a AC if and when they think it is appropriate for the player’s development. Players who have previously been involved in Regional Performance Centre (RPC) Tier 2 activity may also attend ACs.

What happens at DCs and ACs?
Both centres provide regular training sessions where players will receive coaching on the core skills of hockey from appropriately qualified coaches.  As well as training, there will be competition between local DCs and between ACs at the next level up. The combination of training and competition allows players to develop in a variety of situations and ensures that they are assessed over the whole programme (at both levels) in more than just the competition environment.

Where and when are the DCs and ACs?
Players will attend whichever DC or AC is closest to where they live (or in the case of boarding pupils, where they attend school). If you live in Swale then your nearest U12, U13 & U14 JDC is held at OBHC.  The DC preparation sessions are run between July and September, with the competition days during October and November. The AC preparation sessions are run between January and March, with the competition days during April and May. June and December are the designated ‘rest’ periods for hockey in the LTAD model.

What is a Regional Performance Centre?
A Regional Performance Centre (RPC) is a training centre for the U15, U16, U17 and U18 age groups which are open to anyone who has successfully come through assessment from a Academy Centre (AC) or who has previously been involved in National Age Group Squads (NAGS) activity.  After attending a AC, a RPC is the next step on the U18 Player Pathway.

What happens at a RPC?
RPCs provide regular training sessions where players will receive high level coaching on the core skills of hockey from RPC coaches, with additional input from England Hockey’s Centrally Contracted Coaches (CCCs). There are two tiers of RPC activity:

Tier 1 – a phase of 6 training sessions followed by two days of competition. In Tier 1 competition the RPCs are grouped into four clusters of three centres. From Tier 1 activity, players will be selected to represent their cluster squad at Tier 2.

Tier 2 – for the U15 and U17 players this is the High Performance Assessment Camp (HiPACs) and for the U16 and U18 players this is the England Hockey Futures Cup; these pages are listed on the left hand side navigation tab.

The combination of training and competition allows players to develop in a variety of situations and ensures that they are assessed throughout the programme in more than just the competition environment.